Hypotensive Resuscitation – Is the glass half full or half empty?

BennEditorials0 Comments

Rick Dutton, is not only a former member of the Board of Directors for TAS, but is one of the early proponents of hypotensive resuscitation.  You can read his previous editorial Anesthesia During Resuscitation: Pancea or Poison published back in January.
He is currently the Chief Quality Officer for the United States Anesthesia Partners, but has also served as the Chief Quality Officer for the ASA with the AQI, the Director of Trauma Anesthesiology at R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, and the United States Navy.
In this month’s editorial (essentially the sequel to his prior publication for us), he tackles Carrick et al.’s recent publication in the Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery about hypotensive resuscitation in penetrating trauma.  Carrick et al. found a statistically significant reduction in acute renal injury in patients who had a “hypotensive” resuscitation despite no measured differences in mortality or mean arterial pressure.
Rick puts the evidence in perspective and gives insight to some of the limitations when performing research surrounding traumatic events.  Hopefully you will find it as interesting as I did.
Link to the article in PubMed provided below.

Hypotensive Resuscitation – Is the glass half full or half empty?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *